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Ernie Louttit Honesty + Integrity + Leadership

"The Tool is Empathy"

Award-winning author of “The Unexpected Cop: Indian Ernie on a Life of Leadership”, Ernie Louttit provides audiences with an honest and insightful look into his journey. Revealing the truth on a number of taboo topics, Ernie explores the often-contentious issues of policing from an Indigenous perspective. With a passion for progressive leadership and social justice advocacy, Ernie paves the way to a future of empathy and tolerance.

Born in Northern Ontario, Ernie Louttit is a member of the Missanabie Cree First Nation, but was raised in a small village of 600 called Oba. As a teenager, Ernie was forced to relocate to attend a remote boarding-high school in order to complete his education, but soon found himself segregated from his siblings due his darker skin. These colonial barriers became too much to bear, and Ernie left school to become a labourer on the Canadian National Railway. After impressing his impossible to please boss on the railroad, Ernie quickly learned that he could achieve things that others found insurmountable.  

In 1979, and at only 17, Ernie convinced his mother to sign the paperwork needed to join the Canadian Armed Forces, where he served honourably for 5 years in the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry. Ernie went on to become a military police officer and served in that role until his discharge in 1987. His time in the military helped to reinforce Ernie’s belief that hard work and dedication were keys to success.

Ernie was only the third Indigenous police officer in the force’s history when he was hired in 1987, beginning his career during a period of tremendous change in policing. Over the course of the three books he has authored, readers are taken on a remarkable journey that explores racism, empathy, ambition, corruption, leadership, and so much more.  

Ernie’s message of strong leadership, tolerance, and empathy have resulted in multiple speaking engagements where he actively inspires others. Ernie believes this is the best time to be an Indigenous person in Canada, especially for our youth. Through his effective use of storytelling, Ernie masterfully weaves elements of humour into his narrative to convey the often-shocking world of policing as an Indigenous man.

 

  • Leadership: Methods of Leadership and Their Impacts

    Reflecting on his decades of service in the policing industry, Ernie brings invaluable awareness and understanding to many concepts of leadership from his incredibly diverse toolkit. Addressing multiple facets of this topic, Ernie will explain the key differences between negative leadership, socially responsible leadership, and everything in between.

    Learning from this presentation includes:

    • How to envision yourself as a leader
    • The importance of aligning socially responsible diction with action
    • How to lead with passion and inspire others

    Mental Health: Strategies for Well-Being in Crisis

    Ernie’s time in the military helped to prepare him for life on the streets as a patrolman in Saskatoon. Despite this, even Ernie struggled to reconcile some of the trauma he experienced while serving the public. Ernie provides us with insights into how large organizations can better serve the wellbeing of their employees.

    Audiences will learn and develop an understanding of:

    • Balancing the demands of police work and family responsibilities 
    • Mentoring new officers to help them cope with the unpredictable nature of policing
    • Strategies for being effective in traumatic situations

    Confronting Prejudice: Removing Unconscious Biases

    “No person is ever free of prejudice, but how a person manifests their prejudice is the test of their morality”.  Ernie reminds us that cultural and media narratives have the ability to shape our impressions about individuals we have never met. Managing those biases is a crucial skill in our increasingly multicultural society.

    Ernie teaches audiences the importance of:

    • Sharing the responsibility of leadership between the police and community 
    • Seeing beyond what you see day to day and adopting the “invisible people”
    • To have empathy for people, even when they are making choices you don’t agree with
  • "Indian Ernie: Perspectives on Leadership and Policing"

    "In 1987, Louttit became only the third Native officer to serve in a city with a significant Aboriginal population. Drawing from his service as a veteran officer, Louttit – Indian Ernie as he came to be known on the streets – tells tales of conflict and violence, but most vividly, the realities of marginalized people. Demonstrating a passion for his community, he argues empathy can be the greatest tool in an officer's hands. He is passionate about policing, especially with society's less fortunate, and offers insights into addressing the issues marginalized people face."

    "More Indian Ernie: Insights from the Streets"

    "Retired Police Sergeant Ernie Louttit takes you back to the streets of Saskatoon in his second book, a street cop’s view of the realities of dealing with prostitutes, street gangs, drunk drivers, and other offenders. He gives people who are rarely exposed to crime a view of what policing “at the sharp end” is like, while acknowledging the struggles of those who are forced by circumstance to live in high-crime areas. The first point of contact for persons with mental illness and addictions is often the police, and Louttit highlights how changes in handling these individuals must occur."

  • "Your talks are always so motivational, interesting and inspiring."

    - Lillian Denton, SIGA

    "I was very touched by Ernie Louttit’s presentation and message of approaching our most vulnerable population with compassion and free of ego, as well as the personalized messages in the books. It is so important to be reminded of hoe there are those out there who value the gentle, empathetic approach to our students, and to students/adults in general."

    – Alina Floch, Sask. Teachers

    "Today is the international Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. To celebrate I attended a breakfast put on by the Saskatoon Police Service where the keynote speech was given by my friend Ernie Louttit. The thing that resonated with me the most was the comment that we all want the same things no matter who we are and it's our stories that connect us together."

    - Jason Der - March 2015

    "Before this day slips away on me; I would just like to send a quick email to once again thank you for speaking to our wonderful little town of Birch Hills last evening. You were definitely a crowd pleaser Ernie, as I have never witnessed a spontaneous standing ovation, in the last 20 years, as you received last night. Congratulations on a job well done."

    - Val Quayle, Birch Hills Library Gala Board member - April 2016

    "Outstanding presentation Ernie. I love that term “leadership bump."

    – Jason Der, Vandesta Leadership on Tap

  • Awards/Highlights

    • Rasmussen, Rasmussen & Charowsky Aboriginal Peoples’ Writing Award [Indian Ernie], April 2015.
  • Clients

    • Simon Fraser University Aboriginal Students association- Vancouver
    • Saskatchewan Police College -Regina
    • Alberta RCMP Aboriginal Officers Conference –Edmonton
    • Probus (retired Professionals) - Saskatoon
    • Buffalo River Dene First Nation
    • Witchekan Lake First Nation
    • Saskatchewan Court of Queen’s Bench Judges Conference –Saskatoon
    • Credit Union Lenders Association of Alberta Conference- Red Deer
    • Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA) Management Symposium- Saskatoon
    • Canadian Association of Human Rights Associations (CASHRA) conference- Saskatoon
    • Aboriginal Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Conference- Prince Albert
    • Prince Albert Friendship Inn Conference- Prince Albert
    • Gabriel Dumont Institute –Saskatoon
    • Saskatchewan Teachers Convention (2015) –Saskatoon
    • Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology (SIAST) Woodland Campus - Prince Albert
    • Saskatchewan Editors Annual Meeting –Saskatoon
    • Saskatchewan Book Awards- Regina –Saskatoon
    • Dakota Dunes Casino General Assembly (SIGA) – Whitecap First Nation
    • Saskatchewan Crown Prosecutor’s Conference – Moose Jaw
    • Department of Justice (Saskatchewan Office) National teleconference
    • Saskatchewan Aboriginal Government Employees Conference- Regina
    • Peter Ballantyne First Nation Family Wellness Conference – Prince Albert
    • First Nations University of Canada – both Regina and Prince Albert Campuses
    • Canadian Federation of University Women AGM – Saskatoon
    • University of Saskatchewan Violence and Aggression Seminar (2016) – Saskatoon
    • Northern Justice Symposium – Prince Albert
    • Saskatchewan Association of Community Educators Conference – Saskatoon
    • SIGA Central Office Assembly- Saskatoon
    • Saskatchewan Polytechnic Institutes - both Saskatoon and Prince Albert campuses
    • Canadian Broadcasting Corporation - Definitely Not the Opera – Saskatoon
    • Festival of Words – Moose Jaw
    • Birch Hills Library Fundraiser- Birch Hills, SK
    • Saskatoon Public Library
    • Meadow Lake Public Library
    • The Hindu Temple of Saskatoon
    • Elimination of Racism Annual Breakfast – Saskatoon
    • Global Gathering Place – Saskatoon
    • Walter Murray Collegiate – Saskatoon
    • Prince Albert Collegiate – Prince Albert
    • Carpenter High School – Meadow Lake
    • Mount Royal Collegiate – Saskatoon
    • St Joseph’s High School - Saskatoon

Born in Northern Ontario, Ernie Louttit is a member of the Missanabie Cree First Nation, but was raised in a small village of 600 called Oba. As a teenager, Ernie was forced to relocate to attend a remote boarding-high school in order to complete his education, but soon found himself segregated from his siblings due his darker skin. These colonial barriers became too much to bear, and Ernie left school to become a labourer on the Canadian National Railway. After impressing his impossible to please boss on the railroad, Ernie quickly learned that he could achieve things that others found insurmountable.  

In 1979, and at only 17, Ernie convinced his mother to sign the paperwork needed to join the Canadian Armed Forces, where he served honourably for 5 years in the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry. Ernie went on to become a military police officer and served in that role until his discharge in 1987. His time in the military helped to reinforce Ernie’s belief that hard work and dedication were keys to success.

Ernie was only the third Indigenous police officer in the force’s history when he was hired in 1987, beginning his career during a period of tremendous change in policing. Over the course of the three books he has authored, readers are taken on a remarkable journey that explores racism, empathy, ambition, corruption, leadership, and so much more.  

Ernie’s message of strong leadership, tolerance, and empathy have resulted in multiple speaking engagements where he actively inspires others. Ernie believes this is the best time to be an Indigenous person in Canada, especially for our youth. Through his effective use of storytelling, Ernie masterfully weaves elements of humour into his narrative to convey the often-shocking world of policing as an Indigenous man.

 

Speaker Summary

Location: Canada

Language: English

Website: Click Here

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